Nac Mac Vegan: adventures in rabbit food

16/01/2011

Auld Hoose Sunday Lunch

Filed under: Eating out, Pub grub — Tags: , , , — Feòrag @ 15:33

Auld Hoose vegan Sunday LunchUsually, when I go to the Auld Hoose on a Sunday afternoon, it’s for breakfast. This week, I thought I’d try the Sunday roast. I commented that the vegan meal was presumably the same as the vegetarian one, minus the Yorkshire puddings and Jonathan, behind the bar, informed me that they had vegan Yorkshires. That I had to try!

The meal consisted of a classic nut roast with the traditional trimmings. The nut roast itself made no attempt to disguise its main ingredient, and was excellent. The roast potatoes were crispy on the outside, and melty within, and the Yorkshire puddings made my day. The main disappointment was the offering of vegetables, mostly frozen I suspect. There again, it’s not the season for anything other than cabbage and spuds right now.

It did lie a little heavy on my stomach afterwards, but that’s the idea isn’t it?

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20/03/2010

Vegan Breakfast at The Auld Hoose, Edinburgh

Filed under: Eating out, Pub grub — Tags: , , , , — Feòrag @ 14:37

Vegan Breakfast at the Auld Hoose

Vegan Breakfast at the Auld Hoose with sausages, haggis, beans, mushrooms, hash browns, onions and fried bread.


One of the things that pains me about Edinburgh is that since Susie’s Wholefood Diner stopped doing Sunday brunch over a decade ago, there’s not really been a good option for a vegan breakfast. Roseleaf in Leith comes close with their “Leafer”, if you exchange the egg for something else, but they have no substitute for the butter. It does include spinach, though, which makes me happy.

My problem is that I have not been looking under my own nose at one of my regular drinking establishments – The Auld Hoose on St. Leonard’s Street. Perhaps it’s because I’m rarely in there before 5pm, when they stop serving breakfast?

The Auld Hoose is a very traditional pub with a loud rock, goth and punk jukebox and a clientèle to match. It does good solid food, about seven different ciders (including Addlestone’s and Weston’s Organic), a respectable range of whiskies from around the world and lots of beer.

The breakfast is available 7 days a week, and is a build-your-own job. There are more than enough vegan options to go for the seven item version. The vegetarian sausages, haggis and hash browns are all vegan. I chose all three of those plus beans, mushrooms, onions and fried bread. I can’t abide the half-cooked tomatoes that are a breakfast staple, and the chips just seemed Wrong. It’s all pretty standard stuff except the fried bread which is made with baguette, and very filling. My only criticism is that is would be nice to have toast as an option. Well, spinach would be nice too, but I suspect I’m the only person outside Australia who has a thing for breakfast spinach.

The rest of the menu is quite vegan friendly too. The burgers are also build-your-own and the usual veggie burger is vegan. Very rarely they are unable to get the vegan one, so it’s a good idea to check if the staff don’t know you. If they do know you, they’ll let you know. My usual combination, when I have enough of an appetite to eat that much, is relish, jalapenos and mushrooms. There’s a vegan nut roast on Sunday and of the main courses, the five bean chilli and the veggie haggis are both vegan. Snacks, which are big enough for most people as a meal, include pakora and pole-dancing onion rings (ask for the sour cream dip to be substituted for something else) plus the ubiquitous chips.

The Auld Hoose, 23-25 St Leonards Street, Edinburgh, EH8 9QN. Tel: 0131-668 2934. [Map]

08/11/2009

Oslo: Vega Fair Food

Filed under: Eating out — Tags: , , , , , — Feòrag @ 12:48

Sunday is a bit of a dead loss in Oslo, but Vega, located in a former hydrotherapy baths run by the Seventh Day Adventists, is the one exclusively vegetarian place that is open that day (but not, obviously, on Saturdays).

The old Kurbadet entrance.It’s a bit tricky to find. You need to go in the main entrance to the baths (Kurbadet), which looks locked. It isn’t – you just need to turn the knob. Turn left, though the most spectacular Arts and Crafts corridor and turn right just before you get to the door of what used to be the men’s bath.

English is spoken, and they will guide you through the options available to you, and let you know which few dishes in the buffet are not vegan. This afternoon, the only things that weren’t were a pasta salad containing feta, and the lasagne. The lunch buffet was 125 Kr., drinks other than tap water extra.

Keep going down this corridorThere was a creamy asparagus soup, and a wide variety of salads to choose from. The hot dishes were the aforementioned lasagne, stir-fried mixed vegetables and rice – I didn’t bother as the salads were more than satisfying. By the bread were a couple of chutneys–a fantastic banana one, and an Indian style one consisting of large pieces of green chilli and whole cloves of garlic. I liked that one even more.

The atmosphere is exceptionally peaceful and relaxed. There are no windows in the dining area, yet it didn’t feel like I was in a hole in the ground. The loos are worth mentioning, too. Outrageously clean is the default in Oslo, but considerable care had been taken in their decoration too.

Update: I returned the following spring, and the food was even better. The only pain was the woman outside who wanted to evangelise me, even though she spoke bugger-all English.

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